Africa

Case Studies – Africa

CG GLOBAL REPORT 11:
THE ROLE OF SOCIAL ENTERPRISE IN DELIVERING HIGHQUALITY ECCE SERVICES TO THE MOST VULNERABLE: MODELS FROM THE UK AND KENYA

(5/22/2016)

It describes the role of social enterprise models as innovative and sustainable solutions for reaching the most vulnerable children. The authors present two examples from poor communities in different countries: one in poor London neighbourhoods in the UK, and one in urban slums near Nairobi in Kenya. In both cases, increased access to affordable, high-quality early childhood services for vulnerable parents is supported through a self-sustaining financial model based on social enterprise.

CG GLOBAL REPORT 9:
MAKING EARLY CHILDHOOD MEASUREMENT MORE ACCESSIBLE: THE CASE OF MELQO IN TANZANIA

(5/22/2016)

It presents one of the latest innovations for obtaining early childhood data and policy information more readily. The author describes efforts to adapt a rigorous measurement tool created around child development outcomes and quality learning environments – part of the Measuring Early Learning Quality and Outcomes (MELQO) initiative – to the Tanzanian context.

CG GLOBAL REPORT 8:
INEQUITY IN CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: ECD IN EMERGENCIES AS AN ENTRY POINT FOR NATIONAL-LEVEL POLICIES

(5/22/2016)

It describes how conflict in the Central African Republic (CAR) was the starting point for the development of a national-level early childhood policy, through cooperation between the government and a number of international non-governmental organizations (INGOs). A newly created inter-ministerial early childhood committee oversees the implementation of the Community-Led Action for Children (CLAC) model to improve the quality of the health and education sectors.

CG GLOBAL REPORT 4:
ADDRESSING EQUITY AND QUALITY THROUGH INVESTING IN THE ECD WORKFORCE: NAMIBIA’S CHALLENGES AND ACHIEVEMENTS

(5/22/2016)

Since 1996, Namibia has been building a national, integrated set of early childhood policies and legal frameworks, with a strong emphasis on building equity across poverty lines. As in many countries, however, increases in access have not accompanied by improvements in the quality of services. In particular, the workforce is starkly different in terms of qualifications and remuneration between the younger (birth to 4 years) and older (5 to 9 years) age groups.

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